News and Announcements

Public news and announcements are brought to you by the Horry County Public Information Office.


Horry County News and Announcements

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Horry County Fire Rescue Holds Fire Alarm Blitz

Conway, South Carolina-Horry County Fire Rescue is holding a smoke alarm blitz, this Saturday, January 26, 2019, from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. This event was previously scheduled in December but was rescheduled due to inclement weather. Firefighters will be going door-to-door installing smoke detectors in four locations around Horry County. Message boards were posted in the communities earlier this week to let local residents know about tomorrow’s event.

“Smoke detectors save lives, and we are committed to ensuring the fire and life safety of Horry County residents,” said Horry County Fire Rescue Chief Joseph Tanner. “The smoke alarm blitz has been a very successful program here, and we will continue to host these and other fire safety events in our community.”

Each of Horry County’s four battalions will be working at four different locations—

Battalion 1: Woodridge Mobile Home Park off Mineola Avenue in Little River

Battalion 2: Backwoods Mobile Home Park off Peachtree Rd. in Socastee

Battalion 3: Saddlebrook Mobile Home Park off Long Avenue Extension

Battalion 4: Chase Street off Hwy 917

Residents who would like to request a smoke alarm can fill out the online request form here.



Fire Safety Tips from Horry County Fire Rescue: Fire is Fast

Horry County, South Carolina - Did you know, in less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire? Your risk of injury or death in a home fire changes with age. If you have young children or older adults living in your home, they may need your help to stay safe. Here are some important ways to keep your home and your loved ones safe from fire.

Fire Safety If You Smoke

  • Smoking is the leading cause of home fire deaths for adults 65 and over. It is also the third leading cause of fire injuries for older adults
  • If you smoke, smoke outside.
  • Never smoke in bed, while drowsy, or while under the influence of medication or alcohol.
  • Use deep, sturdy ashtrays.
  • Before you throw out your cigarette butts and ashes, make sure they are completely cool. Put them in water or a can that is filled with sand.
  • Check furniture and places where people smoke for smoldering cigarette butts and ashes—especially before going to bed.
  • Never smoke where medical oxygen is used, even if it is turned off.
  • Keep smoking materials, including lighters and cigarettes, up high and out of the reach of children. Use child safety locks where you store your smoking materials.

Fire Safe Cooking

Cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires in America. Many older adults also experience burn-related injuries during cooking. Prevent fires and burns by being watchful and alert when you cook.

  • Don’t cook if you are sleepy, have consumed alcohol, or have taken medicine or drugs that make you drowsy.
  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly. Remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • Keep cooking surfaces clean and free from anything that can catch fire.
  • Never lean over a lit burner.
  • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves while cooking. Loose clothing can catch fire if it touches a gas flame or an electric burner.
  • Check the kitchen after you finish cooking. Make sure the oven, burners, and other appliances are off.
  • If a fire starts, stay calm and get out. Once out, call 9-1-1 from a cell phone or a neighbor’s telephone. Have an outside meeting place a safe distance in front of your house where first responders can see you.

Practice Electrical Safety

Older homes are more likely to catch fire from electrical causes than newer homes. Older wiring may not have the capacity to safely handle newer appliances and equipment and may not have updated safety features.

  • Electrical work should only be done by a licensed electrician.
  • Check all electrical appliances often. Replace cracked, damaged, and loose electrical cords.
  • Replace outlets if plugs do not fit snugly or the outlet does not accept plugs with one blade larger than the other.
  • Major appliances (refrigerators, stoves, washers, dryers, etc.) should be plugged directly into a wall outlet.
  • Plug only one high-wattage appliance into an outlet at a time, even if the outlet has space for two plugs.
  • Avoid using extension cords. Have a licensed electrician determine if additional outlets are needed.
  • Arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) shut off electricity when a dangerous situation occurs. Have a licensed electrician install them in your home.
  • Find reasons for blown fuses and tripped circuit breakers. Have a licensed electrician inspect and correct the problem.
  • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or light fixture.

Every year in America nearly 3,000 people die in home fires. Many of these people die in homes that do not have working smoke alarms. Smoke alarms warn you and your family when there is a fire. They can save your life!

As always, if there is a fire emergency, call 9-1-1 as soon as possible and remain outdoors. Never return inside a burning building to retrieve an item.



Horry County Fire Rescue Wants You to Put a FREEZE on Winter Fires

Horry County, SC - - Did you know that home fires occur more in the winter than in any other season? Half of all home heating fires occur in the months of December, January, and February. With cold weather in the forecast, and the upcoming winter season approaching, Horry County Fire Rescue would like to remind residents to follow these heating tips to help maintain a fire-safe home:

Space Heater

·      Keep anything that can burn, such as bedding, clothing, and curtains, at least 3 feet away from the heater.

·      Make sure the heater has an automatic shut-off, so if it tips over, it shuts off.

·      Turn heaters off when you go to bed or leave the room.

·      Plug portable heaters directly into outlets and never into an extension cord or power strip.

·      Only use portable heaters from a recognized testing laboratory.

Fireplace

·      Keep a glass or metal screen in front of the fireplace to prevent embers or sparks jumping out.

·      Do not burn paper in your fireplace.

·      Put the fire out before you go to sleep or leave your home.

·      Put ashes in a metal container with a lid, outside, at least 10 feet from your home.

Wood Stove

·      Make sure your wood stove is 3 feet from anything that can burn.

·      Do not burn paper in your wood stove.

·      Put the fire out before you go to sleep or leave your home.

·      Have your chimney inspected and cleaned each year by a professional.

Furnace

·      Have your furnace inspected each year.

·      Keep anything that can burn away from the furnace.

Kitchen oven

·      Do not use a kitchen oven to heat the home. It is not designed to heat large areas, and the element may fail which could cause a fire.

Portable Generators

·      Portable generators are commonly used in the winter as a result of storm-induced power outages. Carbon monoxide fumes are odorless and deadly. Follow manufacturer’s instructions to prevent death from carbon monoxide.

·      Use portable generators outdoors in well-ventilated areas away from all doors, windows, and vents.

·      Make sure you have carbon monoxide alarms in your home. Test carbon monoxide alarms at least once a month.

·      Do not use a generator in a wet area. This can cause shock or electrocution.

·      Connect appliances to the generator with heavy-duty extension cords.

·      Do not fuel your generator when it is running. Spilling gas on a hot engine can cause a fire.

Heating pads and electric blankets also pose a fire risk, especially if more than 10-years old. Do not place anything on top of either device when in use, this includes other blankets or pets. Never fold electric blankets or use while sleeping.

Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of your home and inside and outside sleeping areas. You should test your smoke alarm each month. Also, lightly dust or vacuum your smoke alarm after each test. Smoke alarms should be completely replaced every 10-years. Your family should plan and practice a home escape plan during your monthly smoke alarm testing routine.

Lastly, if there is a fire emergency, call 9-1-1 as soon as possible and remain outdoors. Never return inside a burning building to retrieve an item.



Hurricane Florence Update: Horry County Fire Rescue Urges Citizens to Use Caution

Date: 11 September 2018

Time: 11 a.m.

 

Conway, South Carolina –Horry County Fire Rescue would like to remind citizens to utilize extra precautions before, during, and after Hurricane Florence. Here are a few tips:

 

  • Run generators outside and away from open windows or doors.
  • Only use generators if your home is properly wired with transfer switches.
  • Allow generators to cool down before refueling.
  • Never smoke around gasoline containers or during refueling.
  • Use battery operated lights whenever possible.
  • If you use candles, be sure to place them in a sturdy/fireproof candle holder.
  • Never leave candles unattended.
  • Only use gas or charcoal grills for cooking purposes and only use grills outside.
  • Be sure that grills are away from the home and/or any combustible surfaces.

 

In addition, HCFR would like to remind everyone to TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!

 

  • Never walk in flood waters, only six inches of moving water can knock an adult off their feet.
  • If you are trapped by moving water, move to the highest point and call 911.
  • Never drive around barricades.
  • Never drive into moving or flood waters. Just 12-inches of moving water can sweep away a car or small SUV and just 18-inches can carry away larger vehicles.

 

After the storm, there may be power lines down throughout the county. If you see power lines downed, avoid the area and contact the utility company immediately. Remember, lines do not have to be arcing or sparking to be live. Any utility line, including telephone or cable lines, could be energized making them very dangerous, treat every line as if it is live (energized).

 

 

 

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Horry County Emergency Management Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/horrycountyemergencymanagementdepartment

Horry County Emergency Management Twitter:

https://twitter.com/HorryEMD

 

 



Horry County Fire Rescue Tests New Deployment Model, Increases Paramedic Coverage

Conway, SC—Horry County Fire Rescue (HCFR) officials announce that the deployment model being tested in three fire/rescue districts has increased the paramedic coverage by an average of 83% across the three districts in the initial 19 days of the model.

The new deployment model is currently being tested in three stations: Station 18 (Stephens Crossroads), Station 7 (Lake Arrowhead), and Station 20 (Scipio).  In the first 19 days of the deployment model, those stations ran a combined 344 Emergency Medical calls for service.  Of those calls, 300 of the patients (87%), required basic life support (BLS) interventions, and 44 patients (13%) required advanced life support (ALS) interventions. Here are the immediate benefits:

1. This model has increased the availability of paramedics working in those three districts to respond to life threatening emergencies.

2. Paramedic availability and coverage in these three districts increased by an average of 83%. 

3. This model has decreased the amount of overtime required of our paramedics to work each day. 

The new deployment model assigns the paramedic at these stations to the fire apparatus, and the transport unit (ambulance) functions as a BLS unit. This Deployment Model Test has been approved by the HCFR Operational Medical Director, Dr. Thomas J. Martel, and is in full compliance with State EMS Regulation and Law. Each of these stations still has a full time paramedic responding to all ALS calls, just as they did under the previous model. The shift in apparatus assignment allows the ambulance to respond to, and make patient transports, in non-life threatening emergencies.  This allows the paramedic to remain available to respond to life-threatening emergencies.  

In these stations, both the fire apparatus and the ambulance respond to medical emergencies and fire emergencies.  For calls that require BLS interventions, only the ambulance responds, leaving the fire apparatus, with the paramedic, available to respond to life threatening emergencies.  

Horry County Fire Rescue Chief Tanner says, “We are always looking for ways to improve service delivery to our citizens.  The department is encouraged by these initial results, and will continue to work hard for the citizens of Horry County to provide efficient services and excellent patient care.  As a result of these improvements, we have seen a significant boost to employee morale in these areas and we will continue to make adjustments that ensure our members are safe each and every shift.” 



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